In a recent blog post, I mentioned how lucky I feel to keep finding ways to work on free software. In the past couple years, I've had a successful Kickstarter, and followed that up with a second crowdfunding campaign, and now a grant is funding my work. A lot to be thankful for.

A one-off crowdfunding campaign to fund free software development is wonderful, if you can pull it off. It can start a new project, or kick an existing one into a higher gear. But in many ways, free software development is a poor match for kickstarter-type crowdfunding. Especially when it comes to ongoing development, which it's really hard to do a crowdfunding pitch for. That's why I was excited to find Snowdrift.coop, which has a unique approach.

Imagine going to a web page for a free software project that you care about, and seeing this button:

1283 patrons will donate MORE when you pledge

That's a lot stronger incentive than some paypal donation button or flattr link! The details of how it works are explained on their intro page, or see the ever-insightful and thoughtful Mike Linksvayer's blog post about it.

When I found out about this, I immediately sent them a one-off donation. Later, I got to meet one of the developers face to face in Portland. I've also done a small amount of work on the Snowdrift platform, which is itself free software. (My haskell code will actually render that button above!)

Free software is important, and its funding should be based, not on how lucky or good we are at kickstarter pitches, but on its quality and how useful it is to everyone. Snowdrift is the most interesting thing I've seen in this space, and I really hope they succeed. If you agree, they're running their own crowdfunding campaign right now.