This screencast shows what I built. Scroll down for my Yesod braindump.

video link

I've been astonished how quickly this went together. This is my first time using any sort of web framework, and I used a still unusual one, Yesod. It's my first time using Bootstrap too. It's also the first time I've done any AJAX programming!

Bootstrap was something I'd heard of and seen some suspiciously similar looking sites built with, but it was really a pleasant surprise. Being able to make things that work and look good on the web without struggling with CSS is such a nice change. For the first time, it makes the web feel like a UI toolkit to me.

As I've learned Yesod, I kept seeing problems the web framework solves that I either solved in an ad-hoc basis in Ikiwiki, or didn't realize were problems. In the former group are things like having a consistent way to store a URL to redirect to after an action (such as logging in) finishes, and generating urls programmatically in ways that avoid broken links. In the latter group are things like exploiting types to guarantee mistakes can't be made. And also the abstraction of widgets, which combine html, css, and javascript, in a way that can be composed with other widgets.

Overall, I'm really enjoying Yesod, and it's making me productive in new ways.

I also see a lot of potential in Yesod to improve from where it is.

  • Probably the biggest improvement would be generating javascript from haskell code, so the type safety extends to the javascript side.

    There have been many tries at doing this, the first one I'm really tempted to use is Fay. Rather than build a heavy haskell runtime on top of javascript, it essentially uses javascript as its runtime, and offloads type checking to GHC. This lets it generate javascript code that is short and often comprehensible enough to give insights into what the original haskell code does.

    I'm betting this will be integrated into Yesod eventually. They have an active wiki page about it.

  • There's a WAI library for building local webapps with Yesod, but it was not suitable for my needs (for one thing, it lacks security; for another it kills the haskell program when the web page is closed); so I built my own webapp library. A problem with my current pace of development is that I'm building lots of reusable libraries, but I don't have the time to stabalize them and make them generally available. That one goes in the pile of 2k+ lines of such code.

  • Yesod needs a version of the Hamlet markup that can be edited by people who only understand html. That means it should allow closing tags, and tabs, and not have nasty whitespace gotchas. I think this would be easy to build, starting from Hamlet. It could be called "Hecate".. I don't have time right now.

  • The compile time error messages are often beyond atrocious. Seriously, I'm tempted to write a filter to filter out common patterns where there's one line about a syntax error in a Hamlet file sandwitched in between 150 lines of type error gobbly-gook and generated code.

  • Some really nice things could be done integrating Yesod with Bootstrap. Like the ability to build entire sites by just composing together Bootstrap components, with no need to write a single line of html or css. I'm very tempted to try to build this library.

 webpage = bootstrap Dynamic $ do
        setTitle "FooCorp"
        login <- getLogin
        navbar [FixedTop] $ do
            brand "FooCorp"
            link AboutR
            link BlogR
            nav [PullRight] $
                link . maybe LoginR ProfileR login
        div [ContainerFluid] $ content login
            content Nothing = heroUnit $ do
                para $ "We're the FooCorp for you."
                button "Register Today" [Primary, Large] SignUpR
                    [ amazingFeatures
                    , aboutFooCorp
                    , pricing
            content (Just user)  = do
                para $ "Welcome back " ++ name user ++ "!"
                showProfile user