A year ago I posted an anti-platform with some things I wanted to work on over the next year or three. This is a followup to see what, if anything, has been accomplished.

constantly usable testing

CUT generated some discussion in the project, but I've done nothing toward it myself. The only real progress in this area over the last year has been increasing improvements in the testing security team, and the release team, both of which I'm not currently active in.

deprecating www.debian.org

This continues to happen organically, for example, Debian Weekly News stopped and http://wiki.debian.org/DeveloperNews took its place. Aside from pointing out that this is happening, I haven't done much to push it.

double the archive sync frequency again

Sadly, this has not happened yet.

automated whole system testing

HP donated a test machine, which I set up to run emulated tests of installations of i386, amd64, s390, mips, and mipsel. (Arm and armel should be added soon.) I don't always manage to keep all the tests working at all times by myself, but they have been valuable.

developer (virtual) machines

My test machine spits out disk images for 5 architectures that have debian pre-installed on them, but due to hosting issues I have not been able to share those images with others yet.

find the next nslu2

I was pretty sure this would be OpenMoko's Neo phone, but I have only briefly had access to one, and it's not clear it will be easy enough to get the hardware to make it worthwhile to target it.

Meanwhile, tbm has found a more nslu2-like next nslu2, the QNAP Turbostation NAS device, and there's work underway to fully support it from d-i onwards.

Others have also worked on running Debian on various related AP hardware, including the ASUS WL-500g and Linksys WRTSL54GS, using OpenWRT to boot Debian. There's instructions and downloads on a wiki page. It would be good to get this fully supported without the hacks.

Concerning a next NSLU2

Hi there,

as far as I know (never had hands-on experience with a NSLU2), a cheap variant of the plugcomputers came around some month ago. It's a Seagate FreeAgent Dockstar and has compareable features. Except it's running at 1.2 Ghz, 128 MB RAM and costs around 20 Euro. Debian is already running on it, but there is (sadly) no official support for it.

Greets

Comment by Atty